An army of German clones

by Tine
You can get pregnant AND high, with just one dish!

picture by MFinChina

Most people on the Internet speak English. Every English site sooner or later gets it’s German clone. So theres a fight between the English speaking Original being translated into German wanting its piece of the German pie and the “original German” clone. Sometimes the German clone even adds English and tries to enter the territory of the original.Ok obviously that’s not new. TechCrunch for example had an article on that topic about 1 Million years ago.

As German is the 5th mostly used language this totally makes sense to me because the market is there. No.2 to 4 are Chinese, Spanish and Japanese. I’m very sure about China and Japan clones as the situation is very similar to the German speaking area. China and Japan are not only united by their language but they are also one country. Austria, parts of Swiss and Germany have more or less one language but they tend to prefer products adopted to the country. I assume thats similar for Spanish.

That’s the theory so far as we also see it in the facebook vs StudiVZ fight. So get some sort of idea how my cliché fits reality I made a short list comparing some sites to some clones also regarding if they are available in German and/ or English.

Type
English
in German too
in English too
German
News
Digg no
no
Yigg
Bookmarks
del.icio.us no
yes
mister-wong
Reviews
Yelp no
yes
Qype
Marketplace
etsy
no
yes
Dawanda
Microblogging
Twitter no
no
frazr
Documentsharing
Scribd
no
no
Doctus
Photosharing
Flickr yes
yes
Photocase
Videosharing
YouTube yes
yes
sevenload
Blogging
Blogger.com
yes
yes
blog.de
Books
LibraryThing yes
no
lovelybooks
Travel
Trip Advisor yes
yes
holidaycheck
Professional
LinkedIn no
yes
xing
Classmates
Classmates yes
yes
stayfriends
Misc MySpace no
no
unddu

Facebook yes
no
studiVZ

friendfeed
no
no
freundenews

As we see in the chart about half of the sites don’t offer a multilingual choice. I’m aware that this is not really representative and sites like Twitter don’t really need to be translated (even though in this case it wouldn’t be that much work). Still regarding the internationalization, globalisation isn’t that surprising? I have the feeling that most sites which now offer multi languages did that a while after they launched their original product.

Is it still common to build your product just for your local market? Isn’t it some sort of startup mentality to think big and according to that we need to implement multi languages right at the beginning? My feeling is that this is changing right now and to me that’s a good choice. All or nothing right? Or did it start to change long ago and I just missed it?

Also interesting in this context is the GDP by Language 1975-2010 chart and MFinChina’s flickr page.

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